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Digital therapy draws on gaming technology to treat dementia

Written by Kelly Hunter on 30 September 2020

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Enterprise Europe Network helps East Midlands firm to secure vital COVID-19 grant after lockdown stalled efforts to finance clinical trials.

Close-up of elderly patient's hands clasped resting on his legs, with clinician in the background taking notes on a clipboard.

© Getty. Library image.

A Loughborough-based company is being supported through the Covid-19 disruption by Enterprise Europe Network as it develops a digital therapy using gaming methodology to treat people suffering from dementia.

 

Cerebrum Matter’s gaming app, COSMA, stimulates the active parts of a dementia sufferer’s brain through a series of modules targeting memory, emotional and spatial navigation etc.

 

Clinical trials are under way to validate COSMA therapy as a medical device in addition to being a digital therapy.

 

EEN had been working with the company for some months when the Covid-19 shutdown occurred. The immediate impact was felt in the postponement of the PitchFest Showcase Day in March 2020.

 

Innovate UK COVID-19 continuity grant

 

As a finalist, Cerebrum Matter had expected to attract investment for further clinical trials. It had already received grant funding from Innovate UK, the most recent being a Collaborative R&D award of £152,422.

 

Their EEN adviser alerted the company to Innovate UK’s COVID-19 continuity grant and Cerebrum Matter received £100,000, which will ensure that they have the resources to move forward with their technology.

 

A soft launch with pre-orders through the COSMA product website was being planned for 30 September 2020.

 

Cerebrum Matter’s CEO, Kartheka Bojan, is keen to go live with the therapy: “All of the clinical research conducted has shown that the COSMA therapy has the ability to proactively help people in the early to mid-stages of dementia, especially in terms of prolonging quality of life.

 

“We are excited to be going public with the therapy and envisage that COSMA will transform the treatment pathway of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases.”

 

Personalised therapy through AI technology  

 

Meanwhile EEN has been helping the company to find more end-users for clinical trials and to explore technical collaborations with other partners such as the NHS and the Manufacturing Technology Centre.

 

Cerebrum Matter’s software will deliver a programme of activities tailored to the individual’s condition. The company is currently developing AI-based technology with a non-invasive brain activity monitoring (electroencephalography) headset for personalised therapy.

 

The headset, after mapping any cognitive decline, tailors the brain stimulating activities to encourage the affected and connected parts to establish new neural pathways.

 

The software adapts to the patient’s improvement throughout the therapy and can provide data on the patient’s brain activity to carers, family members and GPs.

 

With continuing support from the EEN, Cerebrum Matter has become Brainberry Ltd, with a broader business scope and plans for further advancements within the digital therapy sector.